European Psychotherapy Act

The Psychotherapy act encompasses all the professional actions, i.e. the autonomous, interdisciplinary, relationship-based and evidence-informed psychotherapeutic methods, for the treatment of psychological, psycho-social and psycho-somatic disorders and difficulties.  A relationship of trust, empathy and confidentiality between the Psychotherapist and the client is essential for effective clinical practice.  The Psychotherapy act is underpinned  by national and international ethical codes which respect the dignity, autonomy and uniqueness of all human beings.  Psychotherapy is an independent profession from psychology, psychiatry and counselling.  Psychotherapists usually have a first degree followed by a professional, highly specialized, theoretical and clinical training which includes research methodology and continuous professional development.  The range of psychotherapeutic modalities is broad, and the profession is constantly evolving new developments in theory and clinical practice.

Date of formal adoption from EAP Governing Board: April 30th, 2018

Charles Cassar
EAP President


European Psychotherapy Act (pdf, 252 KB)

Training

Psychotherapists are required to engage in extensive personal psychotherapy during their training which is up to seven years duration. Psychotherapists usually have a first degree followed by a professional, highly specialised, theoretical and clinical training which includes research methodology and continuous professional development. The EAP promotes the recognition of common standards of training throughout Europe, and will ensure their mobility across member states.

Training